Perea Clinic https://www.pereaclinic.com For muscle injuries and effective relief ofrom muscle pain and chronic tenstion Sun, 17 Feb 2019 19:54:03 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 How to prevent cycling injuries – some important reminders https://www.pereaclinic.com/prevent-cycling-injuries/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/prevent-cycling-injuries/#respond Sun, 17 Feb 2019 19:54:03 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5624 What to look out for In order to prevent the most common cycling injuries, it helps to know what they are. Obviously, in some instances accidents occur and injuries can...

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What to look out for

In order to prevent the most common cycling injuries, it helps to know what they are.

Obviously, in some instances accidents occur and injuries can be serious or sometimes fatal. However, we want to put your mind at rest. The media can portray cycling as a dangerous activity. It is, however far safer than many people think.

The vast proportion of bad accidents are caused by recklessness.  Sadly, there will always be thoughtless drivers. But good road sense, and being extra vigilant (especially at junctions) will vastly improve your chances of staying safe.

The fact is, the majority of cycling injuries are overuse injuries. The most affected areas being the knees, ankles, lower back and neck. We look at ways to guard against these more common injuries.

Prevent Cycling Injuries

Prevent Cycling Injuries

Easy steps to help prevent cycling injuries

Booking a proper bike fit is highly recommended. Having your bike set up in a way that is optimal for your body has numerous advantages. It will improve your power output and make your cycling more efficient. But furthermore, it will make for a smoother ride, and ensure that you are not putting undue pressure on joints.

Cyclists are prone to two injuries, in particular, that can be caused by a poorly set-up bike. These are Patellar tendonitis and Achilles tendonitis. Both can be exacerbated by bikes that are not set up in a way that is right for you.

Another consideration you need to keep in mind is proper hydration. The toll that cycling can take on the body can sometimes be deceptive. You are naturally cooled down by the effects of the outside air. As such, you may be unaware of how much you are sweating.

This fluid loss can be problematic. In some instances, it can cause cramps. But almost certainly, it will mean you fatigue more quickly and lose your natural rhythm on the bike. It pays to learn more about proper hydration. And in addition, if your clothes feel particularly salty after you ride, you probably need to take on board extra electrolytes.

Other aids in preventing cycling injuries

It might not be something you have considered before, but regular sports massage can help prevent injury. It will help in a number of ways.

Improved circulation will help provide oxygen and nutrients to fatigued muscles that help them replenish. Releasing and relaxing muscles that are typically shortened will help keep the body more balanced and aligned. The hip flexors and neck muscles, for example, can be severely compromised in the cycling pose. And in addition, massage will keep you more mobile and alert.

There are some common sense guidelines that you must keep to as well. The body needs to warm-up properly, and be allowed to cool down sufficiently to guard against injury. We have written about the importance of these two stages before. But as a bare minimum, you should start and finish your rides at a more sedate pace, and certainly in the lower gears.

 

 

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Treating Tinnitus – How osteopathy might be of help https://www.pereaclinic.com/treating-tinnitus-osteopathy/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/treating-tinnitus-osteopathy/#respond Sun, 10 Feb 2019 20:46:34 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5605 What is Tinnitus? Tinnitus is not the easiest thing to treat. This is because it’s not always easy to pinpoint the cause. Consequently, treating Tinnitus effectively has often proved elusive....

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What is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is not the easiest thing to treat. This is because it’s not always easy to pinpoint the cause. Consequently, treating Tinnitus effectively has often proved elusive.

Furthermore, it manifests in different ways for different people. Many people associate it with a ringing in their ears. However, it can also sound like hissing, clicking, or even a buzzing noise.

It occurs when you perceive sound, but in reality, there is no external sound present. It is often a symptom that there is a problem with your auditory circuit.

The extent of the problem can range from mild to severe. It can affect one, or sometimes both ears. And it may be just temporary or fairly persistent.

It can have a significant impact on your quality of life. It affects how well you hear. But it can also disrupt your work life and your sleep as well.

 

Treating Tinnitus

Treating Tinnitus

Is there an established method for treating Tinnitus?

There isn’t a known cure for Tinnitus. The goal is to manage and improve the symptoms as much as possible to minimise disruption.

And to further complicate matters, there are 4 main types of Tinnitus. These are known as Subjective (the most common), Neurological, Somatic and Objective. These different types arise because possible causes include exposure to excessive noise and the presence of underlying disorders. But there are also other causes related to issues with the sensory system or involuntary muscle contractions.

Many possible remedies have been offered. These include mindfulness, CBT, acupuncture and the use of antidepressants.

However, we want to take a closer look at how Osteopathy can help.

Treating Tinnitus with Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a type of hands-on therapy. The goal is to restore the body’s musculoskeletal system. It differs from Physiotherapy and Chiropractic practices. It’s a modality that takes into considerations factors such as lifestyle and overall health. As such, it tends to be a more holistic discipline.

With Tinnitus, the musculoskeletal system is often awry. Problems can be exacerbated by tension in the muscles of the head, neck and jaw. Take, for example, TMJ Syndrome. This is a condition that affects the alignment of the jaw. It can often lead to Tinnitus symptoms.

A qualified Osteopath can help with such underlying conditions. Often by incorporating myofascial release and other advanced massage techniques. These can be used to work on the muscles and soft tissues of the neck, shoulders, jaw and head. By releasing the underlying tension, symptoms will often die down or cease completely.

Osteopathy can also help by improving blood and lymph flow to ears. It is also beneficial in helping to reduce nerve irritation.

A good Osteopath will be very familiar with the condition. On most occasions, they will be able to help. And even if they are not able to help with your specific case of Tinnitus, they will be able to point you in the right direction.

If you live in the London area and have suffered from symptoms, please do contact us. With our interdisciplinary team of specialists, I’m sure we can help.

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The effects of too much sugar on your health https://www.pereaclinic.com/sugar/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/sugar/#respond Mon, 04 Feb 2019 18:51:12 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5585 The problem with sugar Too much sugar is probably a bad thing. Especially according to various advisory bodies. For example, the Government’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN). They recommend...

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The problem with sugar

Too much sugar is probably a bad thing. Especially according to various advisory bodies.

For example, the Government’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN). They recommend that no more than 5% of your daily calory intake should come from ‘free sugars‘.

But is it really that bad? And how much do we consume anyway?

Let’s take a closer look.

Too much sugar

Too much sugar

Pour some sugar on me

According to the World Health Organisation, 25 grams a day is plenty. Like the SACN, they recently reduced their recommendation for consumption to 5% of daily intake. For someone with a relatively normal BMI, this equates to a limit of 6 teaspoons a day.

And whilst you may think that sounds a lot, it is surprising how prevalent free sugars are within our daily diet. They are not just in the obvious sources like cakes, chocolates, sweets or biscuits. Free sugars are found in ketchup, savoury foods, stir-in sauces and salad cream. They are also found in alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks as well as fruit yoghurts and fromage frais.

But savoury foods do not advertise the fact they are high in sugar. The food labels hide the fact by using unusual names for sugar-based contents. For example, these are some of the alternative names used; glucose, syrup, dextrose, fructose, treacle, molasses, lactose and corn syrup.

The truth is, according to the British Dietetic Association, every age group in the UK is eating at least twice as much “free sugar” as is recommended.

How will excess sugar affect your health

It is important not to overstate the case of how harmful sugar can be. The issue causes much debate and controversy. It is hard for science to come to definitive conclusions because of the limitations on experimentation.

Firstly, it is hard to control all other variables when judging the impact of excess sugar intake on health. To investigate the true long-term impact of high sugar intake, you would need to regulate the intake of all other macro-nutrients and food sources. All food sources would need to be evenly matched in both the test group and control group. Furthermore, it would be unethical to encourage a test group to regularly consume high levels of sugar.

Despite this, there are some areas where science has legitimate concerns about the impact of excess sugar in your diet. Chief among these is the heightened risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes and tooth decay.

And, on the flip side of the coin, science hasn’t categorically disproved a correlation with high sugar consumption and other possible health conditions either. Many specialists believe that excess sugar can be a cause of inflammation, bone pain and may even increase the risk of Alzheimer’s.

While some of the areas may still be open to conjecture, the simple truth is, added sugar isn’t needed for a healthy diet. These are empty calories, devoid of nutritional content, and simply make it harder for you to control your overall calorie intake.

Tips to help you eat less sugar

The best way to reduce your intake is to focus on eating whole and unprocessed foods. As a rule, we tend to eat more and more packaged food. We are slowly losing the art of preparing food from raw ingredients. It’s time to take a step back in the right direction.

Also, you should try to slowly reduce or eliminate the sugar you have with hot drinks. For example, if you habitually take two sugars in your tea, cut back to one. You will adapt to the change in sweetness surprisingly quickly. And over time, you might be able to eliminate sugar from your hot drinks altogether.

It’s a good idea to change your habits with regard to cold beverages too. Definitely cut back on, or cut out fizzy drinks. And try to get your fruit from natural sources rather than fruit drinks. In nature, foods containing sugars usually also contain fibre, vitamins and minerals and water. This makes them far more nutritious and beneficial for the body.

But to tackle the issue of sugar intake comprehensively, it is best to consult with a professional nutritionist. Diet is often a highly personal thing, and a consultation and subsequent dietary plan will go a long way to addressing your individual needs.

 

 

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Lower leg injuries that affect long distance runners https://www.pereaclinic.com/lower-leg-injuries/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/lower-leg-injuries/#respond Mon, 28 Jan 2019 20:47:28 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5559 The post Lower leg injuries that affect long distance runners appeared first on Perea Clinic.

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Lower Leg Injuries

The rate of injuries to the lower leg is high. The knee has the highest incidence of injury in runners. After that, the lower leg is the most vulnerable area. This is partly because of the wide variety of injuries that can occur between the ankle and the knee. We look at some of the most common including calf strain, Achilles tendonitis, and shin splints.

Lower leg injuries

Lower leg injuries

 Anatomy of the calf muscles

The calf consists of two main muscles. Gastrocnemius forms the belly of the calf. And the soleus muscle sits beneath it. The calf is attached to the heel by the Achilles tendon. This is a long fibrous tendon with notoriously poor blood supply.

Calf Strain (pulled calf muscle)

Symptoms: A feeling of sharp pain, tightness or weakness in the calf. Often accompanied by mild swelling. Occasional spasms, and more pronounced pain when standing or walking.

Cause: Overstretching or tearing of either of the two muscles of the calf. Often caused by accelerating during running or changes in direction

Prevention: Making sure that you thoroughly warm up and cool-down as per the earlier instructions. Also, ensure that increases in training load are progressive and incremental.

Treatment: Rest, and only return to running once the calf is completely free from pain and swelling. Ice/Cold compression. Wrap in a soft cloth and apply to the calf for about 8-10 minutes. Repeat about every 2 hours until the swelling goes down. Elevating the calf above the heart (when possible) will also help reduce swelling.

Achilles Tendonitis

Symptoms: Dull ache or sharp pain on the tendon when pushing off from the foot. Tenderness/stiffness in the tendon that lessens as you warm up. The creaking sound when you touch or move your Achilles tendon.

Cause: This is a chronic injury that builds over time. Often caused by increasing mileage or running speed too quickly. Can also be brought on by hill running or hill repeats

Prevention: As for calf strain (see above). In addition, it is important to include bent knee calf stretches as part of your post-stretch routine.

Treatment: The Achilles needs more rest than many other injuries. Usually a minimum of two weeks, but longer for more serious cases. To help restore it properly it is advisable to do specific strengthening exercises prior to recommencing running. Standing or seated calf lowering is very beneficial. We recommend consulting a physiotherapist to ensure full rehabilitation.

Shin Splints

Symptoms: Pain felt over the inside of the tibia (shin bone), often dull and aching. Worsens during running. Often accompanied by tenderness and swelling around the area.

Cause: Although causes can vary, the main cause in runners is the repetitive stress on the anterior tibialis muscle. This stress leads to an inflammation on the bone attachment site of the tibia.

Prevention: Ensure you have the right footwear. Vary the types of surface you run on (hard surfaces exacerbate shin splints), and allow adequate rest for tired and sore muscles.

Treatment: Rest (normally for up to two weeks), ice compression and massage. It is often possible to cross-train during recovery with activities such as swimming, yoga or Pilates.

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London Marathon Newsletter https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-newsletter/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-newsletter/#respond Sat, 26 Jan 2019 17:46:42 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5556 Please click on the link below for access to the first issue of our London Marathon Newsletter London Marathon Newsletter 1 Please click on the link below for access to the...

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Please click on the link below for access to the first issue of our London Marathon Newsletter

London Marathon Newsletter 1

Please click on the link below for access to the second issue of our London Marathon Newsletter

London Marathon Newsletter 2

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London Marathon Training – How to prevent injuries https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-training/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-training/#respond Mon, 21 Jan 2019 21:41:21 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5547 The sensible approach to your London Marathon training London Marathon Training can feel like a chore at times. And in attempt to clock up the miles, it is tempting to plough on regardless....

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The sensible approach to your London Marathon training

London Marathon Training can feel like a chore at times. And in attempt to clock up the miles, it is tempting to plough on regardless.

But injuries for runners are often a little like credit card bills for the irresponsible shopper. If you ignore the early warning signs, the long-term costs are far greater.

In the same way that a prudent investor must plan to take care of their assets, a runner must have a plan to look after their number one asset, their body.

Your training plan needs to factor in stretching, warm-ups and cooldowns, strength work and much more besides.

So, let’s take a closer look at things you can do to help prevent injuries.

London Marathon Training

London Marathon Training

London Marathon training – Posture

The forces acting on the body whilst running are significant. Any postural imbalances in the body will exacerbate these forces and heighten your risk of injury. Picture what happens to a nail if you hammer away at it without lining it up properly. It soon gets damaged and bent out of shape. It’s the same with the body when subjected to mile after mile of running!

And although you are unlikely to perfect your posture before race day, there are plenty of interventions that can help you redress imbalances before then. The first step you need to take is to have your posture analysed.

After that, a qualified physiotherapist can help you counteract some of these imbalances. But also consider activities such as yoga and Pilates, which can help you develop your core strength and flexibility. Both of which will have a positive impact on your posture.

Gait analysis

Your gait is your ‘manner of walking’, but in this case, it refers to the manner in which you run. The key part of the analysis focuses on what happens to your foot as it strikes the floor with each step.

The vast majority of runners ‘overpronate’ as they run. This basically means that the foot rolls excessively inward as it lands. This increases the chance of common injuries such as shin splints, plantar fasciitis and knee problems. Specialist ‘stability’ running shoes can help compensate for this and are instrumental in guarding against injury.

The Warm-up

As tempting as it might be to head straight out of the door and get on with your run, you must force yourself not to skip the warm-up. The warm-up is vital in instigating the physiological responses the body needs to cope with the demands of a run.

As the name suggests, a warm-up causes the body’s muscles to heat up, which is important because it allows them to stretch further. In addition, it increases blood flow and thus provides more oxygen to the muscles. And perhaps most vitally, a good warm-up prepares the heart for the more vigorous activity to follow.

As a bare minimum, the warm-up should include at least two or three minutes of faster-paced walking, some slow jogging or striding and some dynamic flexibility exercises.

The cool-down

One of the easiest ways to ensure you cool down properly is to ease off (rather than speed up!) towards the end of your run. Decelerate into a slow jog, then walk for two or three minutes.

This allows your heart rate to normalise gradually and aids venous return, which in turn helps prevent blood pooling. You want to avoid blood pooling at all costs because it can cause havoc with your veins. A gradual cool-down will also help you to restore a normal breathing pattern and help you to avoid faintness or dizziness.

Be sure to include static stretches as part of the cool-down process. These should cover all the most important muscles used in running including, the calves, thighs, hamstrings, glutes, lower back, the IT band and the adductors. If you are inexperienced in stretching these muscles, seek out expert advice.

Massage

Finally, a great addition to your London Marathon training is massage.

You will probably be familiar by now with a phenomenon that occurs as you train.  That feeling you have when your muscles feel sorer the day after the run. This has been given a technical name and is referred to as DOMS (delayed onset of muscle soreness) within the scientific community.

Important research from late 2017 has shown that massage can play an important part in ‘alleviating DOMS and improving muscle performance’. This is great news, as massage offers you a way to speed up recovery and allows you to run pain-free more quickly.

Additional research shows that people who receive massage ‘experience measurable changes in their body’s immune and endocrine response’. This is central to guard against infection and the breakdown of muscle tissue that can be caused by viruses.

 

 

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Runner’s foot injuries – and how best to deal with them https://www.pereaclinic.com/runners-foot-injuries/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/runners-foot-injuries/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 18:00:17 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5519 Out on your feet Runner’s foot injuries are all too common. That’s because the feet are subjected to enormous cumulative forces during a run. Take, for example, those of you...

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Out on your feet

Runner’s foot injuries are all too common. That’s because the feet are subjected to enormous cumulative forces during a run.

Take, for example, those of you that are currently training for the London Marathon. Depending on how fast you run, you will take anywhere between 1,000 and 2,300 steps per mile.  On the marathon day alone, you may take up to 60,000 steps.

You exert roughly three times your body weight with every step you take running. That can add up to hundreds or even thousands of tons of force acting on the foot.

So, first things first, if you haven’t yet invested in a high-quality pair of running shoes, it is time to do so.

But what else do you need to look out for? Let’s take a deeper look.

runner's foot injuries

Runner’s Foot Injuries

Runner’s Foot Injuries – and the anatomy of the foot

Your feet play a pivotal role in your running action. They help to propel you forward, and they offer you support, balance and mobility. Each foot is made up of 28 bones, 30 joints and more than 100 muscles, tendons and ligaments. The band of tissues (ligaments) supporting the arch of your foot, connecting your heel bone to your toes, is known as the plantar fascia.

The muscles, tendons, bones and ligaments of the feet will all strengthen as you run. But this adaptation process takes time if you want to avoid most of the runner’s foot injuries. It is therefore crucial that any increase in the number of miles you run is incremental. The usual recommendation is to increase your training load by no more than 10% in any one week.

And to help avoid injuries to the feet, vary the type of surface you run on. If you run exclusively on pavements and tarmac, you are asking for trouble. Experiment with park running, track running, treadmills and even aqua-jogging as possible alternatives.

Blisters on the foot

A blister is a sack of fluid in the foot. It can be red if it’s a blood blister, but usually, it is a clear liquid. They are caused by repetitive friction between the socks and feet.  They are often a result of wearing the wrong shoes or having the wrong sock fabric.

To help prevent them you should wear proper running socks, and avoid cotton. The best running socks are made from synthetic materials such as polyester and/or acrylic. These fibres take moisture away from the surface of your skin. Try ‘Twin-skin’ socks, they help absorb friction and reduce blistering. Also, check your shoe size, and seek out advice from a professional sports shoe retailer.

If you do get a blister, don’t pierce it, as it can cause infection. Take some time off running for it to settle down, and make sure you cover it with a plaster. If they start to bleed, they can take a few days to settle.

Plantar Fasciitis

A very common runner’s foot injury is Plantar Fasciitis. You’ll recognize it as pain under the heel bone.  The pain does sometimes travel along the underside of the foot.

Morning is when you often feel it the most, affecting your first step when you get up, but it can also affect you when resting. It is deceptive because it often gets better after walking, or at the beginning of a run.

It is often caused by having tight calf muscles. But it can also result from high or low foot arches. Being overweight can have an impact, as can spending to much time running on hard surfaces.

To help prevent it happening, regular stretching is a must. Regular sports massage will also help to loosen tight calf muscles and the surrounding fascia.

How to treat Plantar Fasciitis

First of all, stop running! Your sports therapist (physio, osteopath or masseuse) can show you appropriate remedial calf stretches. If it is slow to respond to stretching, you may be advised to wear a night splint, heel pads or insoles in your shoes.

You should apply ice in the morning if it is painful, to reduce the inflammation. Use a foam roller daily. You may need a sports massage to release muscles tension and break down any scar tissue that might be exacerbating the problem. Furthermore, if symptoms persist, you may need to see a consultant surgeon.

Stress Fractures

Usually, stress fractures will manifest as pain and swelling on the top of the foot. You will probably experience a localised burning or aching sensation somewhere along a foot bone. In particular, the area will feel sensitive to pressure. Even tying your laces could be uncomfortable. Ordinarily, the condition will worsen if you run.

In essence, a stress fracture is a small crack in the bone, typically the metatarsals of the mid-section of the foot. This can result from impact, but can also come from repetitive movements, especially running and jumping on hard surfaces.

The risk is greater when you do not take adequate rest between training sessions, or suddenly increase running intensity or distance. Therefore, you need to rest regularly, increase distance gradually, and create a proper training plan.

A stress fracture can be one of the worst runner’s foot injuries. If you have one, stop running! See a doctor asap to immobilise the foot and arrange an X-ray or MRI scan. It could take several weeks before you are sufficiently healed to run again.

Look after your feet, and you’ll get a lot more out of your running.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New Year’s Fitness Goals – and how to stick with them https://www.pereaclinic.com/new-years-fitness-goals/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/new-years-fitness-goals/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 21:11:53 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5501 A new year and a new you Have you written yourself a set of fitness goals as part of your New Year’s resolutions? If so, you might have already attended...

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A new year and a new you

Have you written yourself a set of fitness goals as part of your New Year’s resolutions?

If so, you might have already attended an aerobics class, signed up for a new gym membership or done your first park run.

As a rule, however, people tend to quit on these goals quicker than you might think.

According to an article in the Independent,‘quitters day’ can happen as early as the second Friday in January.

Clearly, you are not going to get the body of your dreams within a couple of weeks.

So let’s look at ways you can stick to your fitness goals this year.

New Year's Fitness Goals

New Year’s Fitness Goals

How to set appropriate New Year’s Fitness Goals

For the most part, people set completely inappropriate fitness goals. They are often plucked out of thin air or inspired by some high achieving colleague that doesn’t have the same constraints as you.

Your goals must be appropriate for you. Ideally, the mode of exercise you choose should be enjoyable, practical and keep you injury free. 

Don’t start running in the cold and the rain if that is not your bag. Be creative and think laterally. Is there an activity that will get you fitter but that won’t feel like a slog? Rather than just being a slave to the gym, consider team sports or social activities that may have more structure to them.

The goal should be to get fit in the medium to long-term, not just in the next three months. When you take a longer-term perspective it allows you to experiment and find the activity or activities that you feel motivated to stick with.

Also, when you give yourself more time, you can create smaller goals on your path to your bigger objectives.

In fact, it is vital that you celebrate the small wins. It helps if you keep an exercise journal so you can look back at what you have achieved.

Other ways to stick to your New Year’s fitness goals

Look to find out more about your current level of fitness. Self-awareness can be a great motivator. If you haven’t had a fitness assessment done for a while, see if you can get one done at the gym, or book a session with a Personal Trainer.

When you have a better understanding of where you are currently at, it easier to know what is required to close the gap to where you want to be.

Another great way to keep yourself on track is to find a cause that is bigger than yourself. Maybe you could look to raise funds for a charity that is close to your heart. Training for something or someone can certainly boost your motivation.

And finally, think about giving your body an MOT. You won’t stick to your New Year’s fitness goals if training is causing you pain and discomfort. So why not book a session with a physiotherapist or osteopath and finally get to the bottom of what is causing the aggravation.

Whatever you do, stick with it, and this time next year you will be a lot closer to your goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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London Marathon Equipment – Gaining a vital edge https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-equipment/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-equipment/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:23:33 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5480 Preparing for the London Marathon Having the right equipment for the London Marathon can be a great help. Of course, nothing can replace putting in the hard yards in training....

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Preparing for the London Marathon

Having the right equipment for the London Marathon can be a great help.

Of course, nothing can replace putting in the hard yards in training. But you need to look after your body as best you can in the weeks leading up to the run. And there are certain bits of equipment that will help with that.

In our last blog, we outlined some of the basic equipment you will need for this year’s Marathon. Specifically, we spoke of the importance of good quality footwear and the right sort of clothing.

But there are other items that might help too. We look at some equipment that might come in useful for preventing injuries.

London Marathon Equipment

London Marathon Equipment

London Marathon – Equipment to keep you healthy

Whether you are running for Charity, just for fun, or want to set a new personal best; one thing is key. To perform at your best you need to keep your body as healthy and pain-free as possible.

A big part of running a successful marathon is keeping injury free. And it is important to understand that just a little preparation and prehabilitation can divert a ton of pain further down the road.

The aim of prehab is to prevent injuries BEFORE they occur.

There is equipment that is often used for rehab that you can take advantage of during your training.

Preventing injuries – what equipment can help?

Unsurprisingly, most Marathon injuries occur in the lower limbs. Among the most common of these are runner’s knee, Achilles tendonitis, and plantar fasciitis. Other problem areas include shin splints and a tight IT band.

All of these are overuse injuries. Not only that, but most occur due to tightness and imbalance in muscles and joints. The items below can help relieve tension and help iron out muscle imbalances.

A great and inexpensive piece of equipment is the spiky massage ball. You simply roll the bottom of your foot over it for a couple of minutes a day and it helps relieve tension. It is particularly useful in guarding against problems if you have slightly flat feet or a high arch. Using it regularly can help guard against conditions such as plantar fasciitis.

Another good way to keep injury at bay is by using Therabands. Again, they are very inexpensive and also versatile. They can be used both as an aid for stretching (especially for the thighs) and also for building strength in smaller, but important muscle groups. It is a great piece of equipment for working the smaller gluteal muscles, which in turn can help stabilise your knee.

The final piece of equipment that can support your London Marathon training is the wobble cushion. It’s a simple piece of equipment that challenges your balance and is really useful in conditioning the smaller muscles that stabilise your ankle.

Maximising your training for the London Marathon

All the above items can be bought at a very low cost and can help give a boost to your conditioning.

Of course, as with all equipment, they need to be used properly to be effective.

For more advice on these items, and to ensure you are in the best condition, contact us.

We’ll be happy to help you stay as fit and injury free as possible for the big day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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London Marathon advice – what equipment to buy in the sales https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-tips/ https://www.pereaclinic.com/london-marathon-tips/#comments Mon, 24 Dec 2018 20:48:43 +0000 https://www.pereaclinic.com/?p=5461 The London Marathon is getting closer London Marathon advice comes in all shapes and sizes. However, for the sake of this article, we are focusing on the novice marathon runner. So...

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The London Marathon is getting closer

London Marathon advice comes in all shapes and sizes.

However, for the sake of this article, we are focusing on the novice marathon runner.

So if you are running the 26.2 miles for the first time next April, here are a few useful bits of advice to consider.

London Marathon Advice

London Marathon Advice

Some thoughts on marathon training

Running the London Marathon is the ultimate endurance event for many people.

With this in mind, it pays to prepare well. Especially considering the hard miles of training you will need to endure.

You will probably be getting yourself ready for the meat of your training as New Year approaches.

As of today, the big day is just under 18 weeks away. This is the time to get serious.

Provided you have done some base training, it is time to make a plan for the run-up to the London Marathon.

You are about to set off on the most intense period of your training. Therefore, it is important to be confident in the equipment you have for the task at hand.

London Marathon Advice – The equipment checklist

Top of your list has to be your running shoes. Although you may have bought a decent pair when you initially started your training, you need to consider this. What will the condition of your shoes be like on the day of the Marathon?!

If you are going to need a new pair before you do the run, it is best to buy them while your training load is still relatively small. And certainly, you do not want to be breaking in a new pair on the day of the run or close to it. You will be severely limited by blisters if you do!

It is recommended that you replace your shoes approximately every 500 miles of running. You should be able to calculate how far you have gone so far if you have been keeping a training log.

But the 500 miles is only a rule of thumb. Check the condition of your existing shoes. Press your thumb into the midsole of the shoe. It should be cushioned with some give. If it feels leathery and inflexible the shoes need renewing.

Also, check the heel of the shoe. It should be even on both sides. If the heal has become worn down it will compromise the support and shock absorption.

Don’t scrimp on running shoes. They are vital.

Your running gear

Although it is ok to do some of the initial training on treadmills, you need to spend progressively more time running outside.

So far, the winter has been relatively mild. But as we head into January and February, you need to find ways to keep as warm and dry as possible.

Not being dressed appropriately for the conditions can dampen enthusiasm and cause you to cheat on your plan.

One of the key pieces of advice we can give is layering. Wearing a few thin layers of clothing that you can add and subtract during the run will help you to regulate your body temperature. Try not to wear heavy or bulky t-shirts or sweatshirts.

Crucially, you need base layers that keep the moisture away from your skin as you sweat. This is known as moisture-wicking. It will certainly make your running experience more pleasant. Good quality brands such as Decathlon have tops, shorts and socks all designed with moisture-wicking properties.

Finally, when it comes to clothing there are a few other items to consider. Look to buy proper running gloves (they make it easier to tie up shoe laces that come undone). Also, buy some reflective strips or reflective clothing. You will be running in the dark, or certainly some gloomy conditions, and you need to be visible. And a good quality runner’s head torch is another useful piece of equipment.

And there is plenty more equipment to consider

What we have listed above is some of the bare essentials. We’ll cover some other advice on some useful equipment in our next blog.

In the meantime, if you need any further London Marathon advice or any tips for coping with niggling injuries, do contact us. We’ll be happy to help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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